Congress Committee Assignments 2013 Ford

106th Congress (1999–2001)

Congressional Profile

Total Membership:

  • 435 Representatives
  • 4 Delegates
  • 1 Resident Commissioner

Party Divisions:*

  • 211 Democrats
  • 223 Republicans
  • 1 Independent

*Party division totals are based on election day results.

Congress Overview

Republicans retained their majorities in both chambers though their margin in the House eroded after the 1998 elections. J. Dennis Hastert of Illinois succeeded Georgia’s Newt Gingrich as Speaker in the 106th Congress (1999–2001). The Senate quickly tried and acquitted President Bill Clinton of the House articles of impeachment. Congress overhauled financial services regulation and passed necessary appropriation bills during a lame-duck session.

Historical Highlights

See more Historical Highlights.

Member Information

  • Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress, (1774–2005), Official Annotated Membership Roster by State with Vacancy and Special Election Information for the 106th Congress [PDF]
  • Official Alphabetical List of Members for the 106th Congress [PDF]
  • Official List of Members by State for the 106th Congress [PDF]
  • Learn more about the House of Representatives with an interactive map

Learn more about the People of the People's House

Leadership & Officers

Speaker of the House:
J. Dennis Hastert (R–Illinois)
Majority Leader:
Richard K. Armey (R–Texas)
Minority Leader:
Richard A. Gephardt (D–Missouri)
Democratic Whip:
David E. Bonior (D–Michigan)
Republican Whip:
Tom DeLay (R–Texas)
Democratic Caucus Chairman:
Martin Frost (D–Texas)
Republican Conference Chairman:
J. C. Watts Jr. (R–Oklahoma)
Clerk of the House:
Jeff Trandahl
Sergeant at Arms:
Wilson (Bill) Livingood
Chaplain of the House:
James D. Ford – Lutheran 1
Daniel P. Coughlin – Roman Catholic
Chief Administrative Officer:
James M. Eagen, III
Parliamentarian:
Charles W. Johnson

To view complete lists of individuals who have served in these leadership and official positions since the 1st Congress, visit the People section

Discharge Petitions

NumberDatePetition to Discharge
No. 0001 April 14, 1999 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution (H. Res. 122) entitled, a resolution providing for consideration of the bill
(H.R. 417)
No. 0002 April 20, 1999 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 126)
No. 0003 June 23, 1999 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 197)
No. 0004July 15, 1999 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 192)
No. 0005 August 4, 1999 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 240)
No. 0006 October 5, 1999 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 301)
No. 0007 February 16, 2000 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 371)
No. 0008February 16, 2000 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 372)
No. 0009 May 11, 2000 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 478)
No. 0010 June 14, 2000 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 508)
No. 0011 June 21, 2000 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 520)

The Ninety-fourth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from January 3, 1975, to January 3, 1977, during the administration of U.S. PresidentGerald Ford.

This is the first congress for the currently (as of the 115th) longest serving senator, Patrick Leahy of Vermont

The apportionment of seats in this House of Representatives was based on the Nineteenth Census of the United States in 1970. Both chambers had a Democratic majority.

Major events[edit]

Main articles: 1975 in the United States, 1976 in the United States, and 1977 in the United States

  • January 15, 1975: 1975 State of the Union Address
  • April 30, 1975: Fall of Saigon
  • June 10, 1975: The Rockefeller Commission issued its report on CIA abuses, recommending a joint congressional oversight committee on intelligence.
  • September 5, 1975: Failed assassination attempt against President Ford by Lynette Fromme
  • September 22, 1975: Failed assassination attempt against President Ford by Sara Jane Moore
  • July 4, 1976: United States Bicentennial
  • November 2, 1976:
  • December 12, 1976: Congressional Hispanic Caucus formed

Special or select committees[edit]

Major legislation[edit]

Main article: List of United States federal legislation, 1901-2001 § 94th United States Congress

  • November 29, 1975: Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Pub.L. 94–142, 89 Stat. 773
  • December 23, 1975: Metric Conversion Act, Pub.L. 94–168
  • December 23, 1975: Revenue Adjustment Act (Earned Income Tax Credit), Pub.L. 94–164, 89 Stat. 970
  • February 5, 1976: Railroad Revitalization and Regulatory Reform Act, Pub.L. 94–210, 90 Stat. 31
  • September 13, 1976: Government in the Sunshine Act, Pub.L. 94–409, 90 Stat. 1241
  • September 30, 1976: Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act, Pub.L. 94–435, 90 Stat. 1383
  • October 11, 1976: Toxic Substances Control Act, Pub.L. 94–469, 90 Stat. 2003
  • October 12, 1976: Overhaul of vocational education programs Pub.L. 94–482, 90 Stat. 2169
  • October 19, 1976: Copyright Act of 1976, Pub.L. 94–553, 90 Stat. 2541
  • October 21, 1976: Federal Land Policy and Management Act, Pub.L. 94–579, 90 Stat. 2744
  • October 21, 1976: Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Pub.L. 94–580, 90 Stat. 2795
  • October 22, 1976: National Forest Management Act, Pub.L. 94–588, 90 Stat. 2949

Party summary[edit]

Senate[edit]

Membership changed with two resignations and a disputed election.

House of Representatives[edit]

Total: 435

Leadership[edit]

Senate[edit]

Majority (Democratic) leadership[edit]

Minority (Republican) leadership[edit]

House of Representatives[edit]

Majority (Democratic) leadership[edit]

Minority (Republican) leadership[edit]

Caucuses[edit]

Members[edit]

Senate[edit]

Senators are popularly elected statewide every two years, with one-third beginning new six-year terms with each Congress, In this Congress, Class 1 meant their term ended with this Congress, facing re-election in 1976; Class 2 meant their term began in the last Congress, facing re-election in 1978; and Class 3 meant their term began in this Congress, facing re-election in 1980.

See also: Category:United States Senators and Category:United States congressional delegations by state

House of Representatives[edit]

Many of the congressional districts are linked to articles describing the district itself. Since the boundaries of the districts have changed often and substantially, the linked article may only describe the district as it exists today, and not as it was at the time of this Congress.

See also: Category:Members of the United States House of Representatives and Category:United States congressional delegations by state

House seats by party holding plurality in state

  80+% to 100% Republican

  80+% to 100% Democratic

  60+% to 80% Republican

  60+% to 80% Democratic

  Up to 60% Republican

  Up to 60% Democratic

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